Holding each other up

Churchill on democracyIn this astonishing time, holding each other up is a life saver. My generation, boomers, wistfully remember how democracy used to work. That was then. This is now. It’s difficult to foresee what our democracy will look like when the GOP’s wrecking ball stops swinging.

We have a lot of rebuilding to do but we can, and we will succeed. Many of our fellow Americans put their shoulders to the wheel every day to make our country a better place that lives up to its lofty ideals, with liberty and justice for all. We have a long way to go. The other side has, literally, all the money in the world but there are more of us, with integrity, and–need I say it?–heart.

Will Michael Flynn’s guilty plea for lying to the FBI about his Russian connections mark the beginning of the end of the insanity and corruption in Washington? Let’s hope. One would think that this would give Congress the opening to veto the horrific budget under debate today. I would think that, but I’ve never even met a big donor, much less benefitted from one.

Many of our fellow Americans put their shoulders to the wheel every day to make our country a better place that lives up to its lofty ideals, with liberty and justice for all.

Washington and politics aside, one thing is timeless: humans, animals, and all of Nature need comfort, connection, and nurturing. In this digital age, distracted and addicted to social media, connecting with others is scarce, even though it is essential to our health and well-being.

Loneliness is now recognized as a health risk on a par with obesity and smoking. How do we counteract this? This post, One is the loneliness number, about observing people in the waiting room of a world-renowned retina specialist is a glimpse of people on their own without apparent moral support. This guy only takes patients whose eyes are in big trouble so being there alone is an ominous sign.

What soothes people? Gentleness, understanding, forgiveness, time to reflect, and space to feel uncrowded. Adding art, music, access to Nature, and abundant camaraderie is a good start.

How do we achieve that when affordable housing has become an oxymoron? The National Housing Conference reported that in 2014, more than 9.6 million low- and moderate-income working households paid over fifty percent of their income on housing. 24.2 percent of renter households and 9.7 percent of owner households face this bleak prospect.  Unsurprisingly, countless numbers fear foreclosure or eviction.

My answer is always, and will forever be, nurturing communities to be tolerant, inclusive, resourceful, and resilient.

New Community Vision seeks to partner with congregations and community groups to organize frequent occasions to socialize and meet others. Eventually, relationships will form, some may be close, while others may be respectful and functional–which is a blessing in itself.

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